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    Eight in 10 Indians Support Cutting Plastic Production: Greenpeace Survey

    EnvironmentBio-diversityEight in 10 Indians Support Cutting Plastic Production: Greenpeace...
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    Eight in 10 Indians Support Cutting Plastic Production: Greenpeace Survey

    The survey highlighting public demand for global action ahead of Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee meeting was conducted across 19 countries. It indicates overwhelming public backing for measures aimed at ending single-use plastics and promoting reuse-based solutions.

    Eight out of 10 Indians support cutting plastic production in order to save the country’s biodiversity and limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, reveals a new Greenpeace International report. 

    The survey comes ahead of the fourth Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee (INC4) meeting for a Global Plastics Treaty to be held in Ottawa, Canada this month, indicating that more than 90 per cent of Indians are concerned about the adverse health effects of plastics on their children’s health. 

    The survey which was conducted across 19 countries indicates overwhelming public backing for measures aimed at ending single-use plastics and promoting reuse-based solutions.

    “The high level of support for ambitious action on plastics is similar across all the countries surveyed, but particularly strong in most of the Global South countries where plastic pollution levels are higher,” says the report, adding, “The overwhelming show of public support sends a strong message to the Governments negotiating the Global Plastics Treaty – the public expects political leaders to address pollution from the full life cycle of plastics, by cutting plastic production and banning single-use plastics. A failure to do so will carry political consequences.”

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    In several countries there is a significant disconnect between the level of public support for cutting plastic production and the position of their governments on the treaty. Despite having widespread public support for reducing plastic production in India, the Indian government opposes limitations on plastic production.  

    Greenpeace is demanding that the Global Plastics Treaty cuts total plastic production by at least 75 per cent by 2040 to protect biodiversity and ensure that global temperatures stay below 1.5° C. Over 99 per cent of plastic is made from fossil fuels, and with production set to skyrocket, it is a significant driver of climate change.

    Key findings include:

    • 87 per cent of Indian respondents support cutting the production of plastic to stop plastic pollution.
    • 89 per cent of Indian respondents believe that the Global Plastics Treaty should include targets that oblige governments and corporations to transition away from single-use plastic packaging to reusable and refillable packaging
    • 80 per cent of global respondents advocate for protecting biodiversity and the climate by reducing plastics production.
    • 90 per cent of global respondents endorse transitioning away from single-use plastic packaging to reusable and refillable alternatives.
    • 75 per cent of global respondents support a ban on single-use plastic packaging. 
    • 79 per cent of Indian respondents advocate for the exclusion of lobbyists from the fossil fuel and chemical industries from treaty negotiations.

    “The survey findings are pivotal in the fight against plastic pollution and climate change. The overwhelming support from 87 per cent of Indians and echoed globally reaffirms our shared commitment to safeguarding our planet’s biodiversity and limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius,” said Abhishek Kumar Chanchal, Project lead, Plastic Free Future, Greenpeace India. 

    “With over 90 per cent of Indians expressing grave concerns about the health impacts of plastics on our children, it is clear that urgent action is not only desired but imperative. The findings of this survey underscore the overwhelming public demand for transformative measures, including transitioning away from single-use plastics towards reusable and refillable solutions,” said Chanchal.

    “As we approach the INC4 meeting for a Global Plastics Treaty, Greenpeace urges governments and corporations to heed the call of the people by incorporating ambitious targets that promote sustainable alternatives and prioritize the protection of our environment and climate,” Chanchal said. 

    Image: Nandakumar S. Haridas / Greenpeace

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